Direkt zum Hauptbereich

10 questions for - Annie Liontas



This is a series, I have started on my blog a few weeks ago: I ask authors 10 questions. They can vary, but are often about the habits concerning writing, because this has always been a subject, I was very interested in. My ten questions so far have appeared in German, since I presented them to german writers. But Annie Liontas is my first english speaking writer and I am very grateful to her for answering my at times nosy questions so openly. So I really hope, this will be the beginning of a series of english interviews! Hint Hint Hint!!!! If any foreign authors want to be interviewed, please let me know! 
I met Annie Liontas last year in Lisbon, where we both attended the Disquiet Literary program, which I can highly recommend, and where she read an excerpt from the mentioned novel Let me explain you, which I read and reviewed here on my blog. That excerpt was so good, that I could not wait to have the real thing in hands. And it was not disappointing either. Great book! Highly recommended!

I also love her answers. They are inspiring and make me sit down and read and write and think about, what she said. What else could you possibly want from an interview?


(c) Sara Nordstrom



1. How did you get the idea to write Let me explain you?

It kind of came in a flash.  I was at a crossroads--out of work, struggling with some health issues, not in a great place in my relationship, living with family, having no idea how I was supposed to be adulting--and I suddenly got this vision of a patriarch who believes he's going to die.  I knew he wanted to impose his worldview on his daughters, but I had very little else.  Because the concept came first, it took me a long time to get to know Stavros, to understand what drives him and how he suffers, and because he takes up so much oxygen, it took me an even longer time to give the daughters life.   But your characters teach you something when you write them, which is the greatest blessing of the craft.  

2. Where do you normally write and do you have a, say: daily or so writing routine?

I used to write at night, between the peak hours of 9PM and 2AM, when my third eye opens and I can do more exploratory, imaginative work.  That’s tough with a day-job, of course, so I’m adjusting.  Sometimes I map my work on large sheets and hang them on my walls, and sometimes I write on post-its.  Every time I think I have my process down, I realize it’s changing—perhaps as it should—and I have to try to find another way to trick myself to get the words on the page.

3. Do you have rituals, without which you can 't get started or which feed your creativity?
I need a square table or desk, a half-caff macchiato, and a song on repeat.  At the moment, it's The Weeknd's "Acquainted."

I’ve been documenting my process for a few years now, as a result, and I’ve come to realize that I’m a cyclical writer. I had grown so frustrated with myself for not writing every day, but I'm not sure that's how we work--I'm not sure, specifically, that's how women work.    

In my early twenties I sought out confirmation of writerly rituals (there's a tremendous catalogue of them noted by the writer Ralph Keyes).  I think, in part, that was to reframe my own quirks as not being simple indulgences, but I was also--without realizing--trying to understand how I work.  Like most young writers, I didn't even know there was a "way" to work, I thought inspiration just struck and you were lucky when it did.  Now I know that the rituals are part of the way you get yourself ready for the difficult and often defeating work of creation.   

4. What are you reading right now?

I'm revisiting Gabriel Garcia Marquez' Chronicle of a Death Foretold--and doing a lot of diagramming--in preparation for what *might be* my next project.  I'm too superstitious (read: scared) to say much more.

Also a biography of Marquez, a collection by Kirsten Valdez Quade, a novel by Ishiguro, some fiction by Yiyun Li, and never too far from my nightstand is Baldwin.  I was hoping to get through all of Baldwin this year, but I quickly realized that it is best to sink into him.


5.Which book are books have changed your life?

So many.  That must be every writer's answer.  I remember reading Marquez' Love in the Time of Cholera and weeping on a dock, not because it was heartbreaking but because it was like watching life being shaped from clay.  Angela Carter blew my mind in that way that you think "Somebody has been here before me and she has already done everything I was planning on doing."  Baldwin's If Beale Street Could Talk is always in my head, as is Why the Child is Cooking in the Polenta by the Romanian writer Aglaja Veteranyi.  I am indebted in many ways to Jeffrey Eugenides' MiddlesexBabel, of course, who I think about all the time but am almost afraid to return to, he is that untouchable.

6. Which person from the past, present or future would you love to meet?

Marquez.  Maybe that's because we're talking writers and Marquez to begin with.  Or maybe I am being nostalgic, since he died recently, and since he suffered from dementia.  But I love how politically engaged he was, how playful and mischievous, how passionate, and how he brought together so many worlds in his work.  


7. What is your greatest hope?

No one goes hungry.

I mean that on a literal and biological level, but I think I mean it in all its connotations, too.  You can hunger for opportunity and voice with the same intensity you might hunger for nourishment.  

8. If you were absolutely free, where would you love to live?

Oh, tough one.  I have this sense of writerly wanderlust that lives in the body--that is, I think writers (maybe all people) feel sometimes too confined to a single life, to a single human experience.  Basically, I'd love to live everywhere.  

To answer your question, though--

I could say Greece, of course.  I've been to places in Mexico that I dream of returning to.  I'd love to see Turkey.  I've never been to India other than through literature, and I might blame Salman Rushdie for this, but India probably calls to me most.  Perhaps I'd live in Jaipur for a bit, specifically.  


9. You write because....?

I have to.  

Nature made me into a pack animal, so in some ways it's antithetical to my composition to toil away at something so crumbly in isolation.  I'm a big believer in community and interdependence, but I also know that writing is how I connect to life and the world and people.  It is, for me, a visceral experience, a spiritual experience, and a way of understanding what it means to be alive and fallible.

10. What do you really like about yourself?

I try to take people on their own terms, acknowledging their limitations and the forces that have conspired to bring them to this point.  That doesn't mean they get a free pass, but it does mean I want to--and can, when I'm at my best--hear what they have to say.  

It's a good thing to apply to characters as well as people.  

-- 
Peace,
Annie

Kommentare

Beliebte Texte

My list of favourites 2018

Hier ein paar kurze Highlights meines Jahres 2018, ohne große Worte. Es war ein eher ruhiges Jahr, gespickt mit wunderbaren Ausnahmeerscheinungen. Die Leipziger Buchmesse, im Schnee versunken, ein Konzert von Pearl Jam in der Waldbühne bei strahlendem Sommerwetter, eine Geburtstagsparty in München, bei stundenlangem Platzregen, draußen, eine spontane Fahrt nach Prag, die Marina Abramovic Werkschau in Bonn, eine Reise nach Rom, eine Floßfahrt auf der Mecklenburgischen Seenplatte, die beste Demo meines Lebens... Viele viele random acts of kindness, von Freunden und Fremden.

Filme:




Werk ohne Autor, den ich dank Bloggerfreundin Marina von literaturleuchtet mit einer Freikarte geniessen durfte. Danke 💜Female PleasureLuckyBücher: Ich habe für meinen eigenen Geschmack in diesem Jahr ein paar echte Meisterwerke in den Händen und vor den Augen gehalten, und dann noch viele Bücher, die wunderbar waren, mich überrascht und beglückt haben. Hier nur eine Auswahl. Ansonsten könnt Ihr in meinem Blog …

Philipp Weiss, Am Weltenrand sitzen die Menschen und lachen

Ein Roman ist dies, der alle Regeln sprengt, leichtfüßig, selbstverständlich und nicht einmal dachte ich: so geht das nicht, sondern ununterbrochen, bei der Lektüre der gesamten über 1000 Seiten, aufgeteilt auf insgesamt fünf verschiedene Bände, dachte ich immer nur: ja, genau so geht es. Nur so geht es ab jetzt, dass einer einen Roman schreibt. Alles ist erlaubt und das muss auch so sein.


Am Weltenrand sitzen die Menschen und lachen war vielleicht die befriedigendste Lektüre im gesamten Jahr 2018 für mich und sie fand mich erst zum Ende hin. Da kam meine Freundin aus dem Burgenland und brachte mir dieses wunderbare Buch mit. Ein Schuber, fünf Bände, jedes eine andere Farbe, jedes ein anderer Erzähler. Ich schreckte zunächst zurück und dachte mir, höflicherweise würde ich es nicht ablehnen, aber lesen würde ich es erst so um 2024 herum, oder sogar später. Dann blätterte ich noch am gleichen Abend den ersten Band im Schuber auf, der schwarz ist und las die ersten Seiten und danach konnt…

Lucy Fricke, Töchter

Natürlich habe ich ein Faible für lange, sehr lange, komplizierte, sehr komplizierte Bücher.
Gerade noch schwelgte ich am Weltenrand des Österreichers Philipp Weiss herum, da flog mir zu Weihnachten Töchter ins Haus. Geschrieben ist es von Lucy Fricke, die, wenn ich mich nicht sehr täusche, bei mir um die Ecke wohnt. Jedenfalls beschreibt sie meinen Kiez mit präziser Kenntnis der Sachlage und berichtet sogar von Bizim Kiez, unserem Kampf für den Türkischen Gemüseladen und ja, ich kann mich erinnern, sie dort ein paar Mal gesehen zu haben. Es muss in einem Roadmovie nicht ständig etwas passieren, aber es macht Spaß, wenn es doch so ist. Dies ist ein normales Buch, nicht zu lang, nicht zu kompliziert. Eine spannend und schnell erzählte Geschichte, ein Pageturner der besten Sorte: voller Tiefe und voller Witz.


Es geht um zwei Frauen, die ihren Vätern, bzw. Ersatzvätern, nachspüren und sich gleichzeitig von ihnen verabschieden müssen. Es geht nebenbei natürlich auch um die Mütter und Selbs…

Anke Stelling, Schäfchen im Trockenen

"Wir sind Opfer. Und unseres Glückes Schmied! Wir machen uns gut in egal welcher Kulisse, sind die Protagonisten unseres Lebens."


Anke Stellings neues Buch Schäfchen im Trockenen habe ich verschlungen. Es ist großartig geschrieben und mit seiner Handlung so nah am Leben dran, wie man es selten findet, an dem Hier und Jetzt von mir und vielen meiner Freunde, die mit Kindern und der existentiellen Unsicherheit mitten in Berlin, mitten in einer großen Stadt in Europa leben, wo Neoliberalismus und Kapitalismus die Werte vorgeben und man, plant man schlecht, auch sehr leicht unter die Räder kommen kann. Vielleicht vor allen Dingen dann, wenn man sich dem Leben mit Chuzpe und offenen Armen, voller Vertrauen, ein wenig ausliefert. Hier springe ich vom Zehnmeterbrett, mach' mit mir, was Du willst, Du verrücktes Leben!
Resi ist Schriftstellerin. Sie lebt mit ihrer Familie in Berlin und hat ein Buch über ihre Freunde geschrieben, die im Rahmen einer Baugruppe ein tolles eigenes Hau…

Assaf Gavron - Achtzehn Hiebe

"Ich spürte, dass sie mich ansah, ein intensiver Blick trotz der doppelten Filterung durch Sonnenbrille und Spiegel, und dann zuckten ihre zinnoberrot geschminkten Lippen, die etwas zu voll und zu jung für ihr Alter schienen, und mit einem halben Lächeln sagte sie: "Zum Trumpeldorfriedhof." Ich schaltete in Drive."



Der Taxifahrer Eitan Einoch fährt die fünfundachtzigjährige Lotta Perl an einem ganz normalen Tag zu einer Beerdigung, aber von diesem Moment an verändert sich vieles in seinem Leben. Es wird aufregend, spannend und unversehens findet er sich in der Rolle eines Detektivs wider.
Dieser Roman, der im heutigen Tel Aviv spielt, bezieht einen großen Teil seiner Spannung aus der Vergangenheit, aus der Mandatszeit, als Israel noch nicht Israel war, als Palästina noch von den Engländern besetzt/verwaltet wurde und Lotta Perl und der Engländer, zu dessen Beerdigung sie unterwegs ist, junge Leute und ein Liebespaar waren. Der Roman erzählt von einer Zeit, von eine…

Karl Ove Knausgård - Im Frühling

„Ich hatte begonnen, eine Art Tagebuch für dich zu schreiben, oder einen langen Brief darüber, wer wir waren und was hier passierte, während wir auf dich warteten….Als eine Art, Platz für dich zu schaffen.“
Dieser Gedanke ist so wunderschön, dass er mich jedesmal lächeln lässt: für ein noch im Mutterleib heran wachsendes Kind eine Art Tagebuch schreiben, um für es in dem bereits existierenden Leben einen Platz zu schaffen. Unwillkürlich wünschte ich mir, ich wäre auf diese Idee gekommen, während ich mit meinen Töchtern schwanger war. Mit dieser Aussage hat Karl Ove Knausgård einmal mehr umschrieben, für wie wichtig und mächtig er die Sprache hält. Sie ist für ihn das Medium, welches uns alle im Leben verankern kann, egal, was uns zustoßen mag, egal, wie heftig das Leben sich uns um die Ohren schlägt.  Im Frühling hat mich auf eine  unvorhersehbare Art kalt erwischt. Denn ich hatte ja bereits Im Herbst und Im Winter gelesen, welche ich beide mehr oder weniger ähnlich fand, gerne gelesen…