Direkt zum Hauptbereich

Blessings!- or what else is the sublimity of my absurd existence?

"Wherever we go, there seems to be only one business at hand - that of finding workable compromises between the sublimity of our ideas and the absurdity of the fact of us." Annie Dillard in "Teaching a Stone to Talk"

There was a timed writing exercise a few weeks ago: Count your blessings. At first it seemed easy enough, since life was good. O.k., I thought, give me a second and  I just might do that.
But then, I couldn't do it and the more, I thought about why, I understood: before I count those blessings (plenty plenty) I feel, I have to do justice to pain, a feeling I never acknowledged properly. My childhood hurt, and I didn't admit it. Which has led to an entire life, that hurts at times, when it should'nt, even with all those blessings. So I guess, I have to write about the pain a little bit.

I grew up in a very small german city, it was almost a village. We lived in one big house, eleven people, all family. My aunt and uncle, their three daughters, my grandparents, my parents, my brother and me. In the surrounding houses lived other family members, more aunts and uncles and cousins. I used to play outside a lot. The meadows and orchards all belonged to my grandfather. There was a creek in the orchard (yes, I know, this all sounds like paradise and in a way it was). The creek was called shitty creek though, for obvious reasons. I used to play in it, even wash my hair in it and smelled like a shitty creek myself afterwards. My mother scolded me a lot, for this and other things, mainly I did not behave like a proper girl, but was always dirty and my clothes were torn.
She never beat me. She beat my brother though. My father beat my brother too. He was the difficult child. Apart from shitty creek and some other minor points, I was the easy child.
I don’t remember, when I noticed, that life in our house was unhappy? That it was not normal, to have a yelling mother, a drunken father and that there was a kind of love among my family members without tenderness, but mainly dressed in funny insults, harshness, no understanding for each other at all. Love never showed itself in a recognizable manner. It hid behind many different masks. This was like, it hid, because it feared to be hurt, in case it showed up too obviously.
Its funny, how you hide facts before your own consciousness. I probably knew all along, that we were an unhappy family, but I didnt know any other, so I tried to pretend, this harshness was tenderness and the fights were love and the insults were declarations of admiration. I pretended, the masks, behind which love was hidden, did not matter to me. Even today, when somebody is really mean to me, I might still think, he likes me deep down and is just too shy to show his true feelings, which he hides behind a mask. I never learned properly, to decipher feelings. Like learning a new language, it does get harder, when you get older, but it is never impossible and never too late, to start the learning process. 
My parents fought all the time. I never saw them kiss or hug, not once in my entire life. I didn't know, there was such a thing like hugging and kissing parents.
Instead I was told by my mom, what a bastard my father was and my father just never talked about my mom, he just closed his eyes, when she entered the room and left. I never saw them interact besides the fighting.
I loved my father most of all – he was my favourite person in the world. But he drank too much. And sometimes he disappeared. He was gone for days and we would look for him everywhere and each time, we thought, he had killed himself and we might find his corpse somewhere in the woods. But he always returned and pretended, nothing out of the ordinary had happened -  until the last time, when he didn’t return.
They found him far away from home. He sat in his car, dead, in a parking lot. The main feeling I remember expressed over that traumatic incident was my aunts' shame to go into the village. People would certainly talk about us. She felt embarrassed.
I also remember feeling completely unfree: I now was the daughter of the suicide, which kind of defined me and my opportunities for happiness.

My mom didn’t get along with her sister. Sometimes they would not talk to each other for days and the atmosphere would be icy and dark, it would fill the entire house. I never experienced them solving a conflict. After a few days, they would just talk again and pretend, nothing had happened. My mom is dead now, and her sister still carries this conflict within her. I can tell, because she has photos of all dead family members on her walls, some of the living ones too, but not one of her only sister. 
I don’t know how I developed selfesteem or selfrespect ( I mean, I didn’t until a while ago and it was a LOT of work to get there) because nobody ever told me I was smart, beautiful or lovable. Nobody ever said, I love you, when I was young. Nobody ever hugged me. Well, my dad did once, before I left for a vacation, and the hug was so clumsy, that he broke my glasses and my mom freaked out and I had to go to Paris with those super ugly substitute glasses, but I still have not forgotten that one hug, and it still fills my heart with tons of love for him, gratitude also.
Nobody ever was nice to anybody in that house really, not because they were bad people, they weren’t. They all were really nice in a way. They just didn’t know any better. They truly gave their best and I love them for it.  But my childhood hurt and I never admitted it. 
When I return to my home today, most people are dead, but new people have been born, it still shocks me to see, how they treat each other. Another harsh generation. Their hugs are always almost brutal, and their compliments resemble insults. They all hurt and they could never admit it. It would ruin their lives.
I would describe my family life to others, as if we were sort of the Waltons in Blue Ridge Mountain/Virginia, which was a total escape from reality (or not, when you consider, that we all shape our reality by what we think about it, so in my imagination we were the Waltons, but I was also Simone de Beauvoir writing away in her little office upstairs, in the house with 11 people but no books)  I would pick the funny things that had happened and exaggerate them, because I found my pain very embarrassing. I would hide the ugly things, the pain, pretend, they didn’t hurt, they didn’t exist. After a while I even stopped to tell people, that my father had killed himself. I did not want them to see me in such a dramatic light. I wanted them to see my humour, my intelligence, me, without my pain and my family, me, sitting at my desk, looking so much like Simone de Beauvoir.

So, before I start to count my blessings (plenty plenty), something, I will never ever been done with, I need to list the pain and feel it, to see, that the first blessing is: the pain is over, a mere memory, something that shaped me and after feeling it, I don’t even have to let go, it will let me go.Yes, I am almost there! And then I see, what blessing this family has been after all and how much love there was and is underneath the steady current of harshness and that harshness is always a very proper medium to hide fear and pain. Which makes it even more lovable, because I wanna go back in time and give everybody there a very big hug, with broken glassen and all, because super ugly substitu te glasses really do not matter, what matters is the hug and the kindness. 

© Susanne Becker

Kommentare

Beliebte Texte

Bücherwunschliste, Gedanken zu Motherhood und The Favourite - alles durcheinander

Gestern schenkte mir eine Freundin ein Buch zum Geburtstag, nachträglich.
Ich hatte dieses Buch bereits, was sie nicht wissen konnte und was auch keinerlei Problem darstellt. Denn sie kaufte es bei den Lieblingsbuchhändlerinnen und da darf ich es umtauschen.

Sie schenkte mir übrigens Motherhood von Sheila Heti. Ich habe dieses Buch vor ein paar Monaten gelesen und auch gemocht, aber nicht so, dass ich darüber schreiben wollte. Der Grund ist, glaube ich, dass ich Kinder habe. In dem Buch geht es aber eigentlich darum, die Entscheidung zu treffen, ob man als Frau überhaupt Kinder bekommen sollte. Ich konnte für viele Punkte ihrer Befragung des Lebens sehr große Sympathie entwickeln. Andere schienen mir wie aus einer Welt, die ich für immer verlassen habe. Denn ich habe mich längst entschieden und bin Mutter. Egal, was ich tue, meine Kinder und deren Interessen, deren Wohlergehen, werden immer im Zentrum meines Befindens sein. Nie wieder werde ich vor der Frage stehen, ob mein Leben bess…

Anke Stelling, Schäfchen im Trockenen

"Wir sind Opfer. Und unseres Glückes Schmied! Wir machen uns gut in egal welcher Kulisse, sind die Protagonisten unseres Lebens."


Anke Stellings neues Buch Schäfchen im Trockenen habe ich verschlungen. Es ist großartig geschrieben und mit seiner Handlung so nah am Leben dran, wie man es selten findet, an dem Hier und Jetzt von mir und vielen meiner Freunde, die mit Kindern und der existentiellen Unsicherheit mitten in Berlin, mitten in einer großen Stadt in Europa leben, wo Neoliberalismus und Kapitalismus die Werte vorgeben und man, plant man schlecht, auch sehr leicht unter die Räder kommen kann. Vielleicht vor allen Dingen dann, wenn man sich dem Leben mit Chuzpe und offenen Armen, voller Vertrauen, ein wenig ausliefert. Hier springe ich vom Zehnmeterbrett, mach' mit mir, was Du willst, Du verrücktes Leben!
Resi ist Schriftstellerin. Sie lebt mit ihrer Familie in Berlin und hat ein Buch über ihre Freunde geschrieben, die im Rahmen einer Baugruppe ein tolles eigenes Hau…

Hermann Hesse - Das Glasperlenspiel

Es gab Momente, da verstand ich nichts und wollte das Buch einfach beiseite legen.
Das Buch! Das Glasperlenspiel von Hermann Hesse, sein letzter und umfangreichster Roman, sein Alterswerk, erschienen 1943, in zwei Bänden (ja, das Buch ist sehr dick!). Es lag in meinem Stapel ungelesener Bücher, seitdem ich circa 20 war. Ich habe noch die alte, dunkelgrüne Suhrkamp Ausgabe. Gekauft in einer Buchhandlung am Opladener Markt, die es schon lange nicht mehr gibt. Begonnen habe ich das Buch gefühlt zehnmal, und immer wieder beiseite gelegt, weil ich einfach nichts verstand. Einmal bin ich bis Seite 100 gekommen, weiter nie. Ich beschloss dann, dass man vermutlich doch alt sein müsste, um es zu verstehen, Alterswerk eben! Jetzt bin ich einigermaßen alt und ich kann den Erfolg vermelden: Diesmal hab ichs geschafft. Ich bin durch!

„Versenkung und Weisheit waren gute, waren edle Dinge, aber es schien, sie gediehen nur abseits, am Rande des Lebens, und wer im Strom des Lebens schwamm und mit sein…

Books one should read before one dies/Bücher die man gelesen haben sollte bevor man stirbt

Das ist eine absolut subjektive Liste all jener Bücher, von denen ich finde, jeder sollte sie gelesen haben. Ich führe sie kontinuierlich fort und füge Links zu meinen Rezensionen an, so es diese gibt. Meistens kommen pro Jahr nicht mehr als 2, höchstens 4 Bücher dazu. Ich lese sehr viel, durchschnittlich vielleicht 40 bis 65 Bücher pro Jahr (naja, soviel ist das gar nicht, seien wir ruhig mal wieder ehrlich). Ich lese sehr gezielt. Also ich lese niemals etwas, weil man es gelesen haben sollte. Vielmehr lasse ich mich da vollkommen von meinem eigenen Gefühl leiten. Dennoch sind die Bücher, die mich dann wirklich aus den Schuhen heben, wenige. Ich muss aber auch sagen, dass ich sehr selten Bücher ungern lese, mich hindurch quäle. Da ich so gezielt lese, sind die meisten Bücher auch einfach gut in meinen Augen. Aber auf diese Liste kommen nur die herausragenden. Ich ergänze sie, wie gesagt, ständig. Es lohnt sich also, immer mal wieder hereinzuschauen.
Wie für meinen Blog üblich, verzic…

100 bemerkenswerte Bücher - Die New York Times Liste 2013

Die Zeit der Buchlisten ist wieder angebrochen und ich bin wirklich froh darüber, weil, wenn ich die mittlerweile 45 Bücher gelesen habe, die sich um mein Bett herum und in meinem Flur stapeln, Hallo?, dann weiß ich echt nicht, was ich als nächstes lesen soll. Also ist es gut, sich zu informieren und vorzubereiten. Außerdem sind die Bücher nicht die gleichen Bücher, die ich im letzten Jahr hier erwähnt hatte. Manche sind die gleichen, aber zehn davon habe ich gelesen, ich habe auch andere gelesen (da fällt mir ein, dass ich in den nächsten Tagen, wenn ich dazu komme, ja mal eine Liste der Bücher erstellen könnte, die ich 2013 gelesen habe, man kann ja mal angeben, das tun andere auch, manche richtig oft, ständig, so dass es unangenehm wird und wenn es bei mir irgendwann so ist, möchte ich nicht, dass Ihr es mir sagt, o.k.?),  und natürlich sind neue hinzugekommen. Ich habe Freunde, die mir Bücher unaufgefordert schicken, schenken oder leihen. Ich habe Freunde, die mir Bücher aufgeford…

Karen Köhler - Wir haben Raketen geangelt (Das Leben ist kein Ponyhof!)

"Die Gehirnforscher haben auch herausgefunden, dass wir eigentlich gar keinen freien Willen haben, sondern unser gesamtes Handeln bestimmt ist von einer gigantischen Rechenleistung unseres Unterbewusstseins. Selbst wenn wir denken, wir entscheiden etwas spontan, hat unser Gehirn das alles vorher schon durchgerechnet." aus Das Wild ist scheu, der vorletzten Geschichte aus dem Buch Wir haben Raketen geangelt von Karen Köhler.

Eine Frau steigt mit ein paar wenigen Dingen, darunter eine Isomatte und ein Vogelbestimmbuch, auf einen Hochsitz mitten im Wald. Am Anfang der Geschichte denke ich noch, sie macht einen kleinen Ausflug in die Wildnis, so wie eine Eremitin, um sich selbst zu finden oder so. Sie schreibt jeden Tag etwas in ihr Tagebuch, das sie für B. führt.Beobachtungen der Natur und ihrer selbst. Erst allmählich wird einem klar, dass sie dort hoch gestiegen ist, um zu sterben, bewusst. Sie isst nicht mehr und trinkt nur wenige Schlucke täglich, bis ihr das Wasser ausgeh…